IN THE NEWS

Reports, articles, and blogs offer different perspectives on the challenges and opportunities for a climate smart forest economy. As a program, CSFEP calls for a balanced approach, tailored to local contexts. 

Our Partners

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CSFEP offers a balancing appraoch

A new report predicting future forest product demand will far outweigh supply urges the EU to use land and forest products more strategically. The Climate Smart Forest Economy Program (CSFEP), an innovative initiative from EIT Climate-KIC and partners, may be well-positioned to help.

EIT Climate-KIC

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A Forest Economy for the Future

Forests are both an economic and environmental lifeline. It is possible to both increase use of products derived from them, while at the same time protecting biodiversity and forest cover.

Dalberg

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Sustainable Timber and the Built Environment

Continued global urbanization and population growth trends suggest that global buildings’ stock will have to double by 2060. This is equivalent to adding the floor space of one New York City every month for the next 40 years. Meeting this demand with sustainable timber offers an opportunity to reach net zero

World Economic Forum

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Bio-based and circular buildings for healthy, clean cities

Compiled by EIT Climate-KIC and based on key findings from the European Cities for Climate-Neutral Construction (EU CINCO) project, this Handbook is designed as an interactive manual and tracking instrument with processes and resources to guide an organization's transition toward carbon reduction and greater circularity.

EIT Climate-KIC

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Bio-based and circular buildings for healthy, clean cities

Compiled by EIT Climate-KIC and based on key findings from the European Cities for Climate-Neutral Construction (EU CINCO) project, this Handbook is designed as an interactive manual and tracking instrument with processes and resources to guide an organization's transition toward carbon reduction and greater circularity.

EIT Climate-KIC

External Articles & Resources

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Communicating the importance of embodied carbon and bio-based materials in the built environment

A report by Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance (CNCA) and Laudes Foundation warns that if we do not address embodied carbon emissions, by 2060, embodied carbon emissions may exceed 230 gigatons, which is more than 6 six years of current (2022) global emissions from fuel combustion

Carbon Neutral Cities Alliance

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Forestry embodied carbon methodology

Wood is increasingly used in construction, especially as mass timber in large commercial, institutional, and multifamily buildings, and has gained a reputation as a low-carbon alternative to steel and concrete framing. This paper proposes a methodology to quantify the impact of selecting "climate-friendly" wood to recognize the unique role of forest products in buildings. 

ARUP

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Circularity concepts in forest-based industries

The world’s prevalent economic model, based on a ‘take-make-use-dispose’ approach, cannot maintain and raise human standards of living without causing environmental degradation and incurring economic risks. The analysis provides evidence that not all circular approaches are sustainable under all circumstances. In some cases, the focus on circularity may cause environmental externalities, in other cases, it may not guarantee economic viability.

The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe

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Quantifying the environmental impact of the built environment

The environmental impacts of the built environment are staggering. Although it’s become mainstream to discuss energy efficiency and advocate for minimizing those impacts, architects, engineers, and planners have yet to truly reckon with the magnitude and consequences of everyday design decisions, argues Stephanie Carlisle. 

Stephanie Carlisle

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Clean Construction Policy Explorer

The Clean Construction Policy Explorer is an interactive dashboard showing how cities around the world are supporting the transition towards a resource-efficient and low- to zero-emissions construction sector. The map is a living document and we will keep it up to date as new policies are developed. Use the map to explore and learn about the actions cities are taking to tackle the embodied emissions of their built environment. 

The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe

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Why We Need More Trees in the UK

“This report highlights the important role that farming can play in integrating more trees and woodlands across our landscapes. To achieve this aim we must put farmers at the centre of this transition and ensure they are given the necessary support, including finance, tools and advice to make land management decisions that deliver climate mitigation, biodiversity recovery and sustainable food production. It emphasises the role agroforestry can play in combining trees with food production to make farming more resilient, while making a valuable call for a just transition in our use of land to ensure the benefits are shared by rural communities.”

Martin Lines, farmer and UK Chair of Nature Friendly Farmers Network

Friends of the Earth

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Is Finland's Wood City the future of building?

Engineered woods like CLT have been used in Europe since the 1990s, but they have had a resurgence in Finland thanks to a government-backed wood-building programme designed to ensure 45% of public buildings use wood as a key material by 2025. Developers can apply for grants and get help with tasks such as procurement and risk communication. "I think every company [here] is doing wooden buildings today," says Ms Airaksinen. "The pressure is on for sustainability."

BBC News, Maddy Savage